Mill Ruins

The Bieber – Wigton Mill Ruins are located along the Olentangy River in Delaware County, Ohio.  This grist mill was built from 1843-1844 and has a bit of a colorful history involving owners having to sell it because of financial difficulties.  The mill has weathered floods from the river (the basement of it has been covered in silt because of flooding) and eventually had it’s roof, floor, and beam structure destroyed by fire.  What is left now is a wonderfully massive 3.5 story shell made of 3 foot thick limestone walls.  It is a magnificent structure that is currently owned by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources who, I think, are considering restoring it one day.

All of the lower entry ways have been boarded up with one door having a lock on it which I assume is for the resources department to come in and check on things and do periodic cleaning up.  One side of the building has a great deal of vines growing down the side of it but if you notice, they have been cut.  I’m guessing this is to prevent much damage to the mill as well as not giving people who come to visit a chance to climb up and in.  I’ve read that people have found ways to get inside and I almost did myself but somebody wouldn’t let me crawl through one open archway that was only partially boarded up but also had several protruding nails sticking out of one of the boards left.  I could’ve crawled through but safety first.

Instead I just crouched down in the archway and took a couple of shots of the inside.  You can see the mill from the opposite side of the river but I couldn’t figure out where that was so we just walked our way down to the mill from this side and walked around it as best we could considering the river was in the back and a lot of bramble surrounded it on the other sides.  There was a fall from some of the slippery river mud but nothing was injured other than pride and a big splinter in a finger.  No idea where that splinter came from.

I am now on a mission to find more abandoned sites.

Mill0650-Edit

About imagesbytdashfield

Fine art photographer who loves to see and capture the amazing things in this world. Owner of Images by TDashfield photography. www.imagesbytdashfield.com
This entry was posted in architecture, History, Ohio, photography and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

20 Responses to Mill Ruins

  1. bulldog says:

    Brilliant… did you see or hear any ghosts??

  2. Brett says:

    Great pictures! I like them all a great deal. I love dilapidated sites such as this, and they’re one of my favorite subject matters to photograph. Good luck locating others.

  3. Cindi says:

    I love these photos – especially the ones of the sun shining through the windows. The sun is so warm and full of energy; it’s the perfect contrast to the old building!

  4. ChgoJohn says:

    I’m amazed at how thick those walls are. This thing was built to last — and it has. Great shots, Teri.

  5. The Dose of Reality says:

    These are gorgeous! I know it’s a mill, but it looks like it could have been an abandoned monastery from the Middle Ages or something. So pretty. (Maybe I watch too many movies) –Lisa

  6. Abandoned buildings are so charming and a dream for photographers…great job.

  7. linda says:

    Love the photos, and I hope they do restore this beautiful old building.

  8. Les says:

    There are a number of old Grist Mills around my area here. Some of them have fallen into History, but many still remain. I enjoy going “snooping around” these old Mills from our past with the camera. I’m sure that I have Posted some of them on my Blog. They were the only way Flour was made long ago.

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