Posts Tagged Old St. Charles

The back of history

While the majority of those who visit Old St. Charles meander along the main street, there is something to be said about the back of all of those old and historic buildings… other than the parking lots.  Can you imagine navigating these steps back in 1800’s attire?

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The answer is blowing in the wind

But only if the question was about quilts.  While walking along the river front in St. Charles, Missouri we came across a quilting club that had their wares on display around the train depot building.  I was naughty.  Even though there was a sign that said do not touch – I touched.  You can see by the plastic that is underneath the quilts that there was a slight breeze going through.  Quilts are beautiful things especially when handmade and handed down through generations.  Do you have any?  I don’t know if I gave away the one I had ever since I was a child; if I still have it it is safely packed away somewhere but I do know I still have one I bought at an antique shop that I painstakingly hand repaired the worn by time parts.

There’s just something about quilts that make me think of being safe and warm at home.

 

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Street Photography in Old St. Charles

I am still learning what my new Sony mirrorless camera can do (haven’t found the silent shutter button yet) and sometimes I score and sometimes I miss… but that happens now and again to all of us regardless of how long a time we’ve had our cameras.  We had just left the pub and had walked a bit north when I decided the more unique older buildings were south of the pub; meaning we turned around.  Most of the people on the street that day were tourists and nothing spoke to me until I saw this couple walking up the street.

While it isn’t the ideal composition I was going for (refer back to the still learning the new camera) I wanted to share it because they were such a unique couple.  He looks as if he came right from working on the farm or some carpentry site and she reminds me of someone from the 1940’s.  It’s not the best photo as far as sharpness and no body parts cut off but I feel they are quite the special couple.

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Life and Stuff

I’ve had a lot going on lately.  Some of it has been stressful, some ongoing and painful and some was so what I needed.  I won’t bore you with the first two categories; they have and will continue (hopefully not for too long) to dictate how often I will be posting.  I’ve just returned from visiting Missouri though and that was the so needed part.  This photo was taken while sitting in our favorite pub in Old St. Charles, Missouri.  Nothing like a pint and a photo, huh?

But as this photo taken a few blocks south of the pub says, enjoy the little things.

And I totally enjoyed this super little thing and the rest of the family.  You cannot see it from this photo but I was wearing a Wonder Woman shirt.  We were 2/6th of the Justice League ♥

 

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One of these things is not like the others…

And happened to be hawking roasted chestnuts that were being sold right across the lane; awfully good balancing act going on too!

 

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Pere Noel

Père Noël (French pronunciation: [pɛʁ nɔ.ɛl]), “Father Christmas”, sometimes called Papa Noël (“Daddy Christmas”), is a legendary gift-bringer at Christmas in France and other French-speaking areas, identified with the Father Christmas and/or Santa Claus of English-speaking territories. Though they were traditionally different, all of them are now the same character, with different names, and the shared characteristics of a red outfit, workshop at the North Pole, and team of reindeer.

According to tradition, on Christmas Eve children leave their shoes by the fireplace filled with carrots and treats for Père Noël’s donkey, Gui (French for “Mistletoe”) before they go to bed. Père Noël takes the offerings and, if the child has been good, leaves presents in their place. Presents are traditionally small enough to fit in the shoes; candy, money or small toys.[1]

Père Noël is sometimes confused with another character. In Eastern France (Alsace and Lorraine regions), in Belgium, in Switzerland, and in Eastern Europe there is a parallel tradition to celebrate Saint Nicolas on December 6. He is followed by Le Père Fouettard, who exists also in different parts of Germany (Knecht Ruprecht or Belsnickel), Austria (Krampus), the Netherlands Nicolaas van Myra, and Belgium (Zwarte Piet in Dutch, Le Père Fouettard in French). Le Père Fouettard is a sinister figure dressed in black who accompanies Saint Nicolas and spanks children who have behaved badly.

In Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil, due to the influence of French culture in the 19th century, the name of Papá Noel/Papai Noel was adopted, opposing for example the name of Pai Natal in Portugal.

In Louisiana Cajun culture, a version of Papa Noël is modeled after Santa Claus, in which he arrives at homes in a pirogue towed by eight alligators.[2]

wikipedia

Alligators??????? Mon dieu!

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Buy a flower?

Can’t put my finger on what character she was portraying in the realm of the Christmas Traditions but I know it has something to do with Dickens.

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