Posts Tagged Sigma

Out with 2016 and in with 2017

This has been an incredibly fast year to me.  We’ve traveled to Arizona, New Mexico, New Hampshire, Maine and back home to Missouri – twice.  I had a birthday party, during a heat wave of all things,  that was attended by family and friends; some I haven’t seen in years.  I went hiking in Arcadia, had really really fresh lobster and Maine blueberries (they really are smaller than the ones I usually get at the grocery store), was slightly terrified driving along the Apache Trail, went up in a pink elephant hot air balloon at the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta and I got to meet three blogging buddies in real time.  I also discovered that I like green chile sauce – didn’t see that one coming at all.  I’ve also gotten wrapped very tightly around the little sweet finger of the new grandson.

While this year has been wonderful in many ways it has also been stressful and sad in others.  I won’t get into politics because if you know me you know how I feel about things and that is none too chipper.  This year has seen many entertainers that I have enjoyed for so long leave us far too early – Prince, Bowie, Rickman, Reynolds and Princess Leia (yes I know her name is Carrie Fisher but she will always be Leia Organa to this nerdy girl) to name a few.  I have prayed for friends that were very sick and fighting serious illnesses and I cried with a dear friend of mine who lost her husband of 35 years.  It finally reached a point where I couldn’t and wouldn’t turn on the news because I just was tired of seeing all of the vitriol, violence and senseless killing that was going on across the globe and here in the states.  Peace on earth and goodwill towards human kind? It does occasionally happen… occasionally.

There are no immediate plans on the horizon for us for 2017 other than we will be back in Arizona sometime in January.  I do have my eye on photographing my way through parts of the parks in Utah and DH has even suggested we rent an RV for that.  That will be a first but I have friends who can help me get over my hesitation about that.  Other than Utah we still have St. Lucia, Hawaii and Scotland on our wish list and DH’s Aunt and Uncle have invited us to visit them in Devon, England again.

I hope to meet some of you in person this year if at all possible but even if we don’t I hope we continue to “see” one another here in the land of blog in the new year.  May 2017 be a blessed year for all of us.  See you next year 🙂

Happy New Year!

Teri

 

 

 

 

 

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Our gift and a few words about newborn photography

Our little nugget of love and joy has warmed all of our hearts to the brim.  Is he spoiled much? Is it even possible to spoil a newborn? Do I care and am I going to stop?  No way.  This was my first foray into the land of newborn photography; I was both excited and anxious but in the end I learned some things and I did get almost all of the shots I set out to get.  So what did I learn?  I learned that the younger the baby the slightly easier it is to “pose them” and they tend to sleep a lot more which helps but even at a tender age they have personality.

Eli was just 3 weeks old when these were taken so while he wasn’t going to roll off anywhere.  His sleep patterns were still erratic plus he is a wiggler; I just had to go with the flow.  I picked him up to place him under the Christmas tree and he was sound asleep until he heard the camera click.  From that I learned to turn my camera to silent mode.  What is paramount in newborn photography is the safety of the baby.  Never leave them unattended always have a parent right there or very close by.  It is also important to keep the area you are photographing the baby in warm.  If you don’t supply your own props then use their crib, their toys or something that belongs to another family member.  Baby blankets on the floor or the sofa work well as does putting the little one on the parents bed.

I tried to flip him onto his stomach for some shots but he was not having it.  He sleeps on his back and that’s how he wanted to remain so there went that list of poses out the window.  What worked well for me were the shots I took when someone was holding him like the ones here with my son and daughter in law.  Being held by someone will often get you a facial expression or look that is just wonderful because they are with someone familiar.  A nice thing about newborn photography is that there are so many things you can photograph.  Take photos of the little fingers, the feet, a hand holding a parents finger and so forth.  Now unless the parents are adamant about just having sweet baby shots, photographing them as they happen to be behaving makes for good photos too.  Crying, yawning, sleeping with a funny look on their face whatever they may be doing because in the end it will be a precious slice of what they were like at that age and time.

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I call this one his Hey Macarena pose.  Yes, I’m dating myself…

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And of course we have the “Nana! I don’t wanna anymore!” shot 🙂

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Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays from my end of the internet to yours ♥

 

 

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One of these things is not like the others…

And happened to be hawking roasted chestnuts that were being sold right across the lane; awfully good balancing act going on too!

 

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Pere Noel

Père Noël (French pronunciation: [pɛʁ nɔ.ɛl]), “Father Christmas”, sometimes called Papa Noël (“Daddy Christmas”), is a legendary gift-bringer at Christmas in France and other French-speaking areas, identified with the Father Christmas and/or Santa Claus of English-speaking territories. Though they were traditionally different, all of them are now the same character, with different names, and the shared characteristics of a red outfit, workshop at the North Pole, and team of reindeer.

According to tradition, on Christmas Eve children leave their shoes by the fireplace filled with carrots and treats for Père Noël’s donkey, Gui (French for “Mistletoe”) before they go to bed. Père Noël takes the offerings and, if the child has been good, leaves presents in their place. Presents are traditionally small enough to fit in the shoes; candy, money or small toys.[1]

Père Noël is sometimes confused with another character. In Eastern France (Alsace and Lorraine regions), in Belgium, in Switzerland, and in Eastern Europe there is a parallel tradition to celebrate Saint Nicolas on December 6. He is followed by Le Père Fouettard, who exists also in different parts of Germany (Knecht Ruprecht or Belsnickel), Austria (Krampus), the Netherlands Nicolaas van Myra, and Belgium (Zwarte Piet in Dutch, Le Père Fouettard in French). Le Père Fouettard is a sinister figure dressed in black who accompanies Saint Nicolas and spanks children who have behaved badly.

In Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil, due to the influence of French culture in the 19th century, the name of Papá Noel/Papai Noel was adopted, opposing for example the name of Pai Natal in Portugal.

In Louisiana Cajun culture, a version of Papa Noël is modeled after Santa Claus, in which he arrives at homes in a pirogue towed by eight alligators.[2]

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Alligators??????? Mon dieu!

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Buy a flower?

Can’t put my finger on what character she was portraying in the realm of the Christmas Traditions but I know it has something to do with Dickens.

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Family night at St. Charles Christmas Traditions

One afternoon (which turned into evening) all seven of us piled into two cars and went to show the kids the festivities at the old Saint Charles Christmas Traditions event (link here.) I had forgotten what it took to get two older children and an infant ready to go on an outing in the cold and time marched on.  Let’s just say it went from us being able to go when I’d have good light even though the skies were very cloudy and grey to it being dark and my needing to bring out the flash.  I won’t mention the issues that ensued with cold fingers, cold camera and cold batteries and their life span!

The older ones had fun getting hot chocolate and pretzels while the baby was in his little snow suit which made him look like a Teddy Bear in his infant carrier strapped to his mother’s chest under her coat.  People assumed she was just a bit “chubby” and didn’t realize there was a baby under her coat.  We made the Sugar Plum fairy squeal with delight when we showed her the top of his little head; he slept through the entire outing.  Most of the Santa’s and other characters were gone by the time we arrived but the lights and the hot chocolate were enjoyed until we decided to call it quits and head home to defrost.

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Think Tank Speed Demon Speed Convertible Bag Review

There are many options for carrying cameras and gear.  There are shoulder or messenger bags, belt systems or for us women, bags that look like purses and tote bags but I’ve come across something new!  The Speed Demon speed convertible belt system from Think Tank is one bag that can be worn three ways.  You can wear it as a shoulder bag, as just a belt pack or for those times when you may be carrying gear with some weight or want the extra stability, wear it with the belt system and shoulder strap together.  Three in one – not bad!

The speed convertible line offers different sizes (I love the one named Speed Racer; used to watch that cartoon as a kid) but I picked the speed demon as I felt it would fit my build best.  The bag is curved in the back which makes it fit better to your body and has a padded shoulder strap with non-slip strips on it.  I like that as straps sometimes slip off my shoulders.  The belt straps, when not in use, are stored in zippered side pockets which are located right behind the two side pouches that can be used to hold water bottles, energy bars, a lens cap, seashells, etc.   Mentioning pockets, there are two in the front including one that has spaces for  business cards, media cards, lens pens, your keys etc. along with the attached rain cover.  The back of the bag has a slim pocket and on the inside of the lid there is a long narrow zippered pocket.  There is also another pocket inside of the bag just the right size for stowing flat things like a filter.

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According to Think Tank, this bag will fit a standard DSLR, a mirrorless system, 2-3 small zoom/prime lens or a Canon 5D Mark III with a 50mm attached along with a 35mm and 100mm lens.  The bag was perfect for the mirrorless Sony A7 II camera with 50mm lens I “borrow” from the spouse sometimes with room for two other small lenses.  I shoot with a Canon 5D Mark III and  Canon 35 and 100 mm lenses but I have a Sigma 50mm Art lens which is beefier than the Canon 50mm.  With the Sigma 50mm lens attached only the 35mm Canon lens would fit in the bag next to it but this should give you an idea of what sizes and combinations can fit in this bag.  If you’re using the bag just to carry multiple lenses, the zipper top makes getting to them quick and easy without having to unzip the entire top.

Another great thing about this bag is the modular system connections on the belt.  Think tank has pouches and holsters that will hold a longer lens or even another camera body with attached lens that you can add to the waist belt which will expand your carrying capacity.  I was most comfortable with just one pouch holding a longer lens attached to the belt.  Something else about those belt straps, I did find that while removing them from their pockets was simple, putting them back in required a little bit of trial and error until I got my technique down so that they went in flat and smooth.  I found the entire bag (zippers, snaps, material, etc.) to be quite strong and sturdy as well.  I’m very happy with this bag and I think you would be too.

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For more information about this or any other Think Tank products check out their website at www.thinktankphoto.com .

(This review has been sponsored by Think Tank Photo but all images and opinions are mine unless otherwise stated)

 

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